Category Archive News

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Signs and Symptoms to look out for as soap character is diagnosed with Bowel Cancer

Any Emmerdale fans will have seen that one of their beloved characters, Vanessa Woodfield, has recently, as part of her storyline, been diagnosed with bowel cancer.

Storylines like these are a great way to raise awareness and highlight such important conditions, how they are diagnosed and how they are treated. However, it can also worry/panic some people, so below are the signs and symptoms you should look out for.

Bowel cancer is very treatable but the earlier its diagnosed, the easier it is to treat.

Symptoms can include:

  • Bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo

There are several possible causes of bleeding from your bottom or blood in your bowel movements (poo). Bright red blood may come from swollen blood vessels (haemorrhoids or piles) in your back passage. It may also be caused by bowel cancer. Dark red or black blood may come from your bowel or stomach. Tell your doctor about any bleeding so they can find out what is causing it.

  • A persistent and unexplained change in bowel habit

Tell your GP if you have noticed any persistent and unexplained changes in your bowel habit, especially if you also have bleeding from your back passage. You may have looser poo and you may need to poo more often than normal. Or you may feel as though you’re not going to the toilet often enough or you might not feel as though you’re not fully emptying your bowels.

  • Unexplained weight loss

This is less common than some of the other symptoms. Speak to your GP if you have lost weight and you don’t know why. You may not feel like eating if you feel sick, bloated or if you just don’t feel hungry.

  • Extreme tiredness for no obvious reason

Bowel cancer may lead to a lack of iron in the body, which can cause anaemia (lack of red blood cells). If you have anaemia, you are likely to feel very tired and your skin may look pale.

  • A pain or lump in your tummy

You may have pain or a lump in your stomach area (abdomen) or back passage. See your GP if these symptoms don’t go away or if they’re affecting how you sleep or eat.

Most people with these symptoms don’t have bowel cancer, there are many other health problems that can cause similar symptoms such as piles, constipation, anal fissures or IBS.

If you have any symptoms, don’t be embarrassed and don’t ignore them – book an appointment with your GP.

For more information and advice visit Bowel Cancer UK.

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Novel Coronavirus – Important Advice for Returning Travellers

If you have returned from these specific areas since February 19, you should call NHS 111, stay indoors and avoid contact with other people even if you do not have symptoms:

  • Iran
  • Specific lockdown areas in Northern Italy as designated by the Government of Italy
  • Special care zones in South Korea as designated by the Government of the Republic of South Korea
  • Hubei province (returned in the past 14 days)

If you have returned from the areas below since February 19th and develop symptoms, however mild, you should stay indoors at home and avoid contact with other people immediately and call NHS111. You do not need to follow this advice if you have no symptoms:

  • Northern Italy (defined by a line above, and not including, Pisa, Florence and Rimini),
  • Vietnam
  • Cambodia
  • Laos
  • Myanmar

What are the symptoms?

  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • Difficulty breathing

If you develop these symptoms and are concerned, please stay indoors, avoid contact with others where possible and call 111.

For further guidance please visit gov.uk

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Novel coronavirus – what you need to know

The NHS in Cheshire and Public Health England (PHE) are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

The risk to the general public is moderate. If you have arrived back to the UK from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau within 14 days, follow the specific advice for returning travellers.

Anyone who has travelled to China or places listed above in the last 14 days and develops symptoms of cough or fever or shortness of breath, should immediately:

  • Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with the flu
  • Call NHS 111 to inform them of your recent travel to the country

Information for the public is available at gov.uk/coronavirus

Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact. A person can also be infected by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands.

The risk of being in close contact with a person with coronavirus or contaminated surfaces is very low at the current time, as members of the public who have visited Wuhan, Hubei province, China are currently in isolation.

Testing of suspected coronavirus cases is carried out in line with strict regulations. This means that suspected cases are kept in isolation, away from public areas of the hospital and returned home also in isolation. Any equipment that come into contact with suspected cases are thoroughly cleaned as appropriate. Specific guidance has also been shared with NHS staff to help safeguard them and others.  Patients can be reassured that their safety is a top priority, and are encouraged to attend all appointments as usual.

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.

You can find the latest information and advice from Public Health England at www.gov.uk/coronavirus

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Have you taken part in a clinical research trial?

The Clinical Research Network North West Coast would like to thank those patients who have taken part in a clinical research trial.

They have produced a short survey to obtain feedback about your research experience as your views are extremely important to how they run future research studies. 

If you have been part of a clinical trial and would like to take this short survey, please visit their survey page.

Please note that the survey is open until 20th March 2020.
Thank you for your support.

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Did you know you can access NHS 111 for advice online?

You can access NHS 111 online, providing you with fast and convenient access to urgent health advice digitally.

NHS 111 online offers people an alternative to the 111 phone service, as well as helping to manage increasing demand on the telephone service – but please note it does not replace the phone service.

How does it work

To access the service simply visit 111.nhs.uk, enter your age, sex, postcode and main symptom, and then you will be guided through a series of questions about your health problems.

At the end of the questions you will be given advice about the best course of action to take next, which could be:

  • information on how to get the right healthcare in your area, including whether you need to see a GP or seek urgent care
  • advice on self-care

In most areas, get a call back from a nurse, doctor or other trained health professional if you need it.

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EU Exit

On this page, you will find information that will help to explain how the NHS is preparing for the UK exiting the EU. 

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is leading the response to EU Exit across the health and care sector and is working closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement to ensure that the NHS is best prepared.

What does this mean for me?

Supply of medicines & prescriptions

We have put contingency plans in place to ensure the continued supply of medicines and other medical products.

Please keep ordering your repeat prescriptions and taking your medicines as normal. It’s very important you don’t order more medicines than normal. If you do, then it may mean that other people won’t be able to get their medicines.

If you’re concerned speak to your pharmacist, GP or specialist.

You can read more about getting your medicines if there’s a no-deal EU Exit here:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/medicines-information/getting-your-medicines-if-theres-no-deal-eu-exit/

Goods and consumables

Along with our NHS Partners we have been closely monitoring the supply of non-clinical consumables, goods and services and you should still be able to find/order the same goods as you do now following the EU Exit.

EU Colleagues and European Qualifications

Across Cheshire the NHS is fortunate to have a number of colleagues who are EU nationals and Recruitment teams have been supporting with EU Settlement Scheme applications. You can find out more here. https://www.gov.uk/eusettledstatus

European qualifications that are currently recognised automatically by UK regulators (such as doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists and pharmacists) will continue to be recognised after the UK leaves the EU.

Healthcare abroad

The NHS.uk website is being regularly updated with information on the healthcare arrangements with individual countries. Please click here for further information (and check the relevant country guide if you are traveling to the EU after 31 October)

https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/healthcare-abroad/healthcare-when-travelling-abroad/travelling-in-the-european-economic-area-eea-and-switzerland/

 

To find out more

https://www.gov.uk/brexit

The EU Exit website contains detailed information on how individuals can prepare for the EU Exit, including if you have a business or are an EU national living in the UK.

This website now includes a simple ‘checker’ to find out what you may need to do to get ready for the EU Exit.

 

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EU Exit advice for patients

We have heard from many of our patients with questions around their health and care as a consequence of an EU Exit.

The best source of information can be found on www.nhs.uk. This website will be updated on a regular basis.

Information for patients regarding medicines

Please keep ordering your repeat prescriptions and taking your medicines as normal. It’s very important you don’t order more medicines than normal. If you do, then it may mean that other people won’t be able to get their medicines.

Further information is available on www.NHS.uk

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GP Net Earnings 2017/18

NHS England requires the net earnings of all the doctors engaged at the practice to be publicised and the following disclosure be shown.  

It should be noted that the prescribed method for calculating earnings is potentially misleading because it takes no account of how much time doctors spend working in the practice and should not be used to for any judgement about GP earnings, nor to make any comparisons with other practices.

The average earnings for GPs working in the Oaklands Medical Centre in the last financial year ending in 2017/18 was £50,676 before taxation and National Insurance.
This is for 3 full-time GPs, 4 part-time GPs and 3 locum GPs

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Have you checked out our brand new Care Hub directory of services?

You may have noticed we have a new tab on our website titled ‘Care Hub’!

Care Hub is a brand new directory of local non-NHS services and providers that you as patients can access to find local services. You can find information on a range of topics to support you to live well including health support, financial aid, volunteering, arts, activities and social groups.

You can start using Care Hub straight away, simply click on the Care Hub tab and use the categories to narrow down what you are looking for!

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Have trust in your GP surgery receptionist

GPs across South Cheshire and Vale Royal are urging us to talk to their receptionist, to make sure you get the right help, which may not necessarily be from your GP surgery.

Services are constantly changing and, in many circumstances, your GP may not be the best person you need to see. 

Reception teams across South Cheshire and Vale Royal have undertaken additional special training to make sure you can get to the right Healthcare Professional to treat your needs.

This is called ‘Care Navigation’, where your receptionist or care navigator will ask why you are contacting the practice, to make sure you get the right care sooner.

Dr Annabel London, GP and Clinical Lead for Primary Care at NHS South Cheshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Vale Royal CCG, said: “My main message is to have trust in your receptionist, they’re bound by the same rules of confidentiality as I am, so they’re not asking questions to be nosey.

“Through the specialist training, they will be able to direct you to the best person or service who can treat your condition or help with the reason why you’re calling.

“An example would be back pain – if you ask for a GP appointment but don’t say why, you could wait to see your GP. When you see your GP they would direct you to self-refer to a physiotherapist as the best person to treat your condition.  With Care Navigation, if you tell the care navigator a few of your symptoms, they can advise you how to self refer straight to physiotherapy without waiting to see a GP to be aware of this.  

“You get the treatment you need sooner, allowing a GP appointment to be used by a patient who can only see a GP.”

The Care Navigator might suggest you see an alternative health care professional such as:

  • a Dentist
  • a Midwife from the local Maternity Services
  • a Pharmacist from your Community Pharmacy
  • a Physiotherapist
  • a Clinician from Sexual Health
  • other local support services

Care navigators will continue to receive ongoing training to support them in developing their role and skills.

Dr London added: “Please, help us to help you by answering the questions from the care navigator get you the right care in the right place and at the right time.”